CARTR Annual report – 2010

Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) in Canada: 2010 results from the Canadian ART Register

Joanne Gunby, M.Sc.
CARTR Co-ordinator

Abstract

All 28 Canadian assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinics participated in the Canadian ART Register (CARTR) for 2010. A total of 18,454 cycles was reported to CARTR, resulting in 5950 clinical pregnancies and at least 4621 deliveries, 4571 live births, 3533 singleton live births, 2741 healthy term singletons, 1052 multiple births (including 33 high-order multiple births), and 5707 infants, 37% of whom were from multiple gestations. Birth outcomes were unknown for 191 ongoing pregnancies (4.0%).

In 11,806 IVF/ICSI cycles using the woman’s own oocytes, per cycle started, the clinical pregnancy rate was 34.9% (40.2% per embryo transfer), the live birth rate was 27.2%, the singleton live birth rate was 20.8%, and the healthy term singleton rate was 16.2%; the multiple birth rate per delivery was 23.8%, with a high-order multiple birth rate of 0.8%. ICSI was performed in 71% of cycles. One or two embryos were transferred in 76% of cycles. In 508 IVF/ICSI cycles using donor oocytes, per cycle started, the clinical pregnancy rate was 49.8%, the live birth rate was 39.9%, the singleton live birth rate was 27.7%, and the healthy term singleton rate was 20.6%; the multiple birth rate was 30.9%, with a high-order multiple birth rate of 0.5%. In 4640 FET cycles using the woman’s own oocytes, per cycle started, the clinical pregnancy rate was 26.7%, the live birth rate was 20.3%, the singleton live birth rate was 16.7%, and the healthy term singleton rate was 13.1%; the multiple birth rate was 17.7%, with a high-order multiple birth rate of 0.6%.

The number of ART cycles performed in Canada continued to increase in 2010 compared with previous years. In IVF/ICSI cycles, the multiple birth rate was reduced by 5 percentage points compared with 2009; in consequence, the clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were also lower. In donor oocyte and FET cycles, the multiple birth rates were also lower than in 2009 and the clinical pregnancy and live birth rates remained about the same.

Full article is available: CARTR 2010