Scientists in Reproductive Endocrinology SIG

The Basic Science Special Interest Group (Scientists in Reproductive Endocrinology) represents the large number of bench scientists working in fertility, infertility and other areas of reproductive biology. The overall goal of the SIG is to provide a forum for Canadian reproductive biologists to present the results of their work, to learn from basic science presentations at the Annual Meeting and at other CFAS sponsored events.

The SIG has participated in development of the program for the Annual Meeting, to feature cutting edge research with basic and clinical significance. In addition, the SIG fosters networking and collaboration among its members, and furnishes a venue for trainees and young investigators to interact. Further, the Basic Science Special Interest Group fosters cooperation between basic scientists clinical and industrial researchers to increase opportunities for joint funding initiatives and knowledge translation.

M A Sirard4aMarc-André Sirard DMV PhD started his carrier as a veterinarian. After graduated studies at University Laval on in vitro fertilization to generate the first clinical method to produce test-tubes calves in 1985, he went for a post-doctoral training to the laboratory of Neal First in Wisconsin to study in vitro maturation of oocytes.

Dr. Sirard came back to Québec in 1987 and became a full professor in 1995. He has published over 265 scientific papers and has been invited to give over 50 invited lectures in international meetings. He founded the Centre de Recherche en Biologie de la Reproduction in 1995 which has grown to include more than 100 people today. He obtained a senior Canadian Research Chair in 2000 on genomics applied to reproduction and is leading an international effort to define the normal genomic program in early mammalian embryos which has become an NSERC strategic network in 2008. His current research activities are focus on oocyte quality and the link between the oocyte and the follicle in animal models and in human.

greg photoGreg FitzHarris is Professeur Agregé at University of Montreal, running a lab that seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in eggs and embryos.

Greg obtained his PhD at University College London (UCL) in the lab of Prof John Carroll (200-2003), and then carried out postdoctoral training in the lab of Prof Jay Baltz (Ottawa), before returning to the UK to set up his own lab in 2007. From 2007-2014 he ran an independent group at UCL, funded by grants from the UK Medical Research Council (MRC). In 2014 Greg moved the lab to Montreal, where the lab is now funded by grants from CIHR NSERC, and Fondation Jean-Louis Levesque. Greg’s lab’s work on chromosome segregation and aneuploidy has been published in leading journals such as PNAS, Development, Current Biology, and Scientific Reports, and our recent work on embryo aneuploidy featured heavily in the Canadian press. Our studies employ both mouse and human oocytes.

Greg is an Editorial Board Member and Handling Editor for REPRODUCTION (2011-ongoing), and previously served on the Council (Board of Directors) for the Society for Reproduction and Fertility (the CFAS’s UK counterpart) from 2009-2013. Greg founded the UK Reproductive Biology regional training network REPROSOUTH.

Andree Gauthier-Fisher_photo 2015Andrée completed her Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of Toronto in 2009, where she studied the molecular mechanisms that regulate how stem cells generate neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes (the three main cell types in the brain) during fetal brain development, and how perturbations in these early events can lead to neurological and cognitive dysfunction later in life. In her ensuing postdoctoral studies at the Hospital for Sick Children, she investigated molecular mechanisms that promote the maintenance of neural stem cells from embryogenesis to adulthood.

She joined the CReATe Fertility Centre research team in 2010 as the Director of Stem Cell Research, and established teams to investigate the potential of human umbilical cord perivascular cells for regenerative therapy, focusing largely on cardiovascular, neurovascular as well as reproductive medicine applications. She currently leads a team investigating stem cell-based strategies for male and female fertility preservation, collaborates on multiple projects in embryology, ovarian biology, andrology as well clinical research, and coordinates research training, outreach and capacity building programs at the CReATe Fertility Centre. She is co-chair of CReATe’s Leadership and Partnership committee and a member of the Ethics committee. She frequently participates in peer-review for funding organizations and scientific journals, and has authored greater than 15 publications and 75 conference abstracts.